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Thread: Personalized Medicine

  1. #1
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    Personalized Medicine

    If Ivan Illich were alive today he would have to dig deeper to find the mechanistic behaviour he correctly observed in hospitals not so long ago. Well, not exactly but soon perhaps. There is an app about to hit the market on Apple and maybe Blackberry too. It will monitor patients and send information back and forth so that people and doctors will more quickly address things like heart attacks. It might even include a place to store medicine and apply it when needed.

    Here is the most important advance which might even lead to an end to prescribing drugs that don't fit with a person's metabolism or interact dangerously.

    http://www.cancer.org/cancer/news/ex...-medicine.aspx

    http://time.com/2807965/apple-invest...e-smart-homes/

    Perhaps this link will help people wade through the potentials for genetic therapy and manipulation.

    http://history.nih.gov/exhibits/genetics/sect3f.htm
    Last edited by R_Baird; 03-31-2015 at 10:03 AM.

  2. #2
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    Many people listen to doctors who sound impressive; but are not up to speed on research and alternatives. Don't play Russian roulette with your health and become informed consumers as much as you can.

    https://prezi.com/olpgqmy0vc4e/copy-of-antidepressants/

    When we soon are able to personalize our genetic nutritional needs including changes in metabolism of a daily nature, will you change what you eat?

    ""Epigenetics is unraveling a continuous cross talk between our genetic profile and the environment. Indeed, genome is much more “flexible” than previously thought and such flexibility underscores the relevance of “good eating” for maintenance of good health. Future nutritionists will have to face the challenge of elucidating the mechanism of nutrition-induced epigenetic changes during pre and post-natal life, to optimize nutritional interventions in a “personalized” perspective.” Genes & Nutrition

    "Traditionally, we understand that individual phenotypes result primarily from inherited genetic variants together with environmental exposures. However, many studies showed that a remarkable variety of factors including environmental agents, parental behaviors, maternal physiology, xenobiotics, nutritional supplements and others lead to epigenetic changes that can be transmitted to subsequent generations without continued exposure. Recent discoveries show transgenerational epistasis and transgenerational genetic effects where genetic factors in one generation affect phenotypes in subsequent generation without inheritance of the genetic variant in the parents. Together these discoveries implicate a key signaling pathway, chromatin remodeling, methylation, RNA editing and micro-RNA biology. This exceptional mode of inheritance complicates the search for disease genes and represents perhaps an adaptation to transmit useful gene expression profiles from one generation to the next.” Human Molecular Genetics

    In four weeks, a high-glucose diet was found to shut down the gene that creates digestive enzymes. Food wouldn’t move through the digestive tract, and it couldn’t be absorbed.” Molecular Biology Reports. 2010 Apr; 37(4):1867-1874. Note this is a great example of epigenetics in action, simply avoid the sugar and your epigenome will not be rearranged negatively

    "Some genetic activity can be altered beneficially by diet and lifestyle. Excess blood glucose causes unfavorable gene expression that can lead to excess insulin production, sustained activation of inflammatory pathways, and increased risk of developing disease complications. Genetic and other insulin-regulating signals can be turned “down or off” when exposed chronically to high glucose levels. Low blood glucose provides the benefit of activating hTERT (human telomerase reverse transcriptase) an enzyme that keeps telomeres from shortening when cells divide. Maintaining low glucose levels has been shown to extend the life span of healthy cells. " Glucose And Your Genes

    "You can control many genes that control disease risk as well as length of life - just by managing your glucose (blood sugar) levels." How Glucose controls life and death Note this is a great example of epigenetics in action, simply avoid the sugar and your epigenome will not be rearranged negatively."


    http://healthyprotocols.com/2_epigenetics.htm
    Last edited by R_Baird; 12-24-2015 at 04:24 PM.

  3. #3
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    Stem cell research is a major part of future medical solutions which can target disease or be used in anti-aging treatments. The latter may prove unnecessary if the Japanese team who have succeeded in identifying a genetic on/off switch to restore youthful genetic functioning becomes available for humans.

    "Current research: blood diseases

    A major limitation of cord blood transplantation is that the blood obtained from a single umbilical cord does not contain as many haematopoeitic stem cells as a bone marrow donation. Scientists believe this is the main reason that treating adult patients with cord blood is so difficult: adults are larger and need more HSCs than children. A transplant containing too few HSCs may fail or could lead to slow formation of new blood in the body in the early days after transplantation. This serious complication has been partially overcome by transplanting blood from two umbilical cords into larger children and adults. Some researchers have also tried to increase the total number of HSCs obtained from each umbilical cord by collecting additional blood from the placenta. Neither solution is entirely satisfactory.

    Much research is focused on trying to increase the number of HSCs that can be obtained from one cord blood sample by growing and multiplying the cells in the laboratory. This is known as “ex vivo expansion”. Several preliminary clinical trials using this technique are underway. The results so far are mixed: some results suggest that ex vivo expansion reduces the time taken for new blood cells to appear in the body after transplantation; however, adult patients still appear to need blood from two umbilical cords. More research is needed to understand whether there is a real benefit for patients, and this approach has yet to be approved for routine clinical use.

    Current research: other diseases

    Several research teams have reported studies in animals suggesting that cord blood can repair tissues other than blood, in diseases ranging from heart attacks to strokes. These findings are controversial: scientists often cannot reproduce such results and it is not clear HOW cord blood may be having such effects. When beneficial effects are observed they may be very slight and not significant enough to be useful for developing treatments. If there are positive effects, they might be explained not by cord blood cells making nerve or heart cells, but by the cells in the cord blood releasing substances that help the body repair damage.

    Current research aims to answer these questions in order to establish whether safe and effective treatments for non-blood diseases could be developed in the future using cord blood. An early clinical trial investigating cord blood treatment of childhood type 1 diabetes was unsuccessful. Other very early stage clinical trials are now exploring the use of cord blood transplants to treat children with brain disorders such as cerebral palsy or traumatic brain injury. However, such trials have not yet shown any positive effects and most scientists believe much more laboratory research is needed to understand how cord blood cells behave and whether they may be useful in these kinds of treatments

    The future

    Experts believe that umbilical cord blood is an important source of blood stem cells and expect that its full potential for treatment of blood disorders is yet to be revealed. Other types of stem cell such as induced pluripotent stem cells may prove to be better suited to treating non-blood-related diseases, but this question can only be answered by further research."

    http://www.eurostemcell.org/factshee...ure-challenges
    Last edited by R_Baird; 12-24-2015 at 04:27 PM.

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