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Thread: The Voynich Manuscript

  1. #1
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    The Voynich Manuscript

    Probably the greatest enigma of the last millennium in regards to cryptography is the Yoynich Manuscript rumoured to have been the work of Roger Bacon by John Dee who was trying to peddle it in Rudolf II's alchemical Athenaeum or university. Dee and Kelley were spies and part of the Inner Sanctum Francis Bacon, Invisible College continuum of Stuart Royal Rosicrucianity. The Soc Ros en Anglia re-starting the Templars was done by my namesake and probable ancestor Robert de Bruges (The Bruce).

    So let me take a wild stab at what this manuscript is. Tokkharian is a language of the Urumchi area where we have the mummified red-heads near the Great Wall of China. It is related to Luwian of Crete and found in NE Europe before being found anywhere in between Urumchi and NE Europe according to Elizabeth Wayland Barber in The Mummies of Urumchi. Crete and New Grange in the Emerald Isles have investiture evidences aligned with the same astrological events. I see some academics saying the scripts look Sino or Thai and the Urumchi people's went to Barabudor in Indonesia as well as many other places after their homeland was taken over by the desert. John Mus did a great analysis of the script and meaning of the Temples in this region. The linguistic schools in ancient Urumchi (Phoenicians) developed language alphabetaics for people all over this Earth. The academics are trying to find one locale as is their idiotic desire to do. It is they who still sell the Flat Earth fiction - see my book with that title.

    There are many connections between the Kelts of all these regions for many millennia but academia keeps trying to hide any evidence of sea-faring and contact throughout the whole world. Of course the secret trading routes and maps were closely held and guarded secrets of great value. Francis Bacon owned land in Nova Scotia near Oak Island where pirates and traders kept an enormous treasure trove said to include Solomon's treasures (see the movies with Cage/Coppola including National Treasure). The families keep knowledge of their ancestors and it would not surprise me if Roger of Sicily is related to the Coppolas, and is of the ancient Benjaminites. Roger is a Norman or Viking earlier known as Phoenician Kelt. What connection other than alchemy is there between Francis and Roger? Francis wrote a book about a Utopian future or society and it is based on a knowledge of the Incas which I wonder if he knew about as did others like Robert the Bruce who ran trade to North America long before Columbus came with maps supplied by Templar re-formations including the Knights of Christ headed by his father-in-law.

    There are very interesting designs in this manuscript which seem more than mere observations one might see through a microscope in an alchemist's lab. Some things are what I would expect if the person doing the work had a Philosopher's Stone. Of course, academics and even some alchemists will tell you it does not exist in the material sense. A Stone such as Nostradamus had see through time portals into dimensions of alternative futures. I address these matters and proofs thereof under threads including Leonardo Da Vinci and his bike, helicopter etc..

    Wikipedia has an interesting corollary to what I am saying. Glossolalia or channelling contacts the past but I think it can also contact these future potential realities.

    "The argument for authenticity is that the manuscript appears too sophisticated to be a hoax. While hoaxes of the period tended to be quite crude, the Voynich manuscript exhibits many subtle characteristics which show up only after careful statistical analysis. The question then arises as to why the author would employ such a complex and laborious forging algorithm in the creation of a simple hoax, if no one in the expected audience (that is, the creator's contemporaries) could tell the difference. Marcelo Montemurro, a theoretical physicist from the University of Manchester who spent years analysing the linguistic patterns in the Voynich manuscript, found semantic networks such as content-bearing words occurring in a clustered pattern, and new words being used when there was a shift in topic.[47] With this evidence, he believes it unlikely that these features were simply "incorporated" into the text to make a hoax more realistic, as most of the required academic knowledge of these structures did not exist at the time the Voynich manuscript was created. These fine touches require much more work than would have been necessary for a simple forgery, and some of the complexities are only visible with modern tools.[48]

    A page from the biological section showing "nymphs"
    In their 2004 book, Gerry Kennedy and Rob Churchill hint at the possibility that the Voynich manuscript may be a case of glossolalia, channeling, or outsider art.[49]

    If this is true, then the author felt compelled to write large amounts of text in a manner which somehow resembles stream of consciousness, either because of voices heard, or because of an urge. While in glossolalia this often takes place in an invented language (usually made up of fragments of the author's own language), invented scripts for this purpose are rare. Kennedy and Churchill use Hildegard von Bingen's works to point out similarities between the illustrations she drew when she was suffering from severe bouts of migraine—which can induce a trance-like state prone to glossolalia—and the Voynich manuscript. Prominent features found in both are abundant "streams of stars", and the repetitive nature of the "nymphs" in the biological section.[citation needed]

    The theory is virtually impossible to prove or disprove, short of deciphering the text; Kennedy and Churchill are themselves not convinced of the hypothesis, but consider it plausible. In the culminating chapter of their work, Kennedy states his belief that it is a hoax or forgery. Churchill acknowledges the possibility that the manuscript is a synthetic forgotten language (as advanced by Friedman), or a forgery, to be preeminent theories. However he concludes that if the manuscript is genuine, mental illness or delusion seems to have affected the author.[49]"
    Last edited by R_Baird; 11-23-2015 at 03:13 PM.

  2. #2
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    This author sees MacGuffins everywhere and should be looking in the mirror.

    "Joseph Campbell wrote extensively about the “Hero’s Journey”, his condensation of mythology into the single ur-story (often referred to as the “monomyth“) beneath it all. In recent decades, Campbell’s work was popularized by Chris Vogler in his book “The Writer’s Journey”, that distilled the original 17 stages to a 12-stage / 3-act writing template. All of which makes the recent Hollywood writer’s strike seem to me potentially anachronistic: in 10 years time, the [Auto-Plot] button will probably have put them all out of a job anyway.

    Incidentally, if you’re familiar with the “Patterns” literature (where recurring patterns of behaviour are given names in order that people can recognize them and manage their causes, rather than simply fire-fighting their consequences), you should be very comfortable with the monomyth: it’s basically a pattern template for mythological behaviours.

    The first of Campbell’s stages is the “Call To Adventure“: someone (a Herald) or something (a Macguffin, say) challenges the Hero (and, behind the scenes, often the Anti-Hero too) to take temporary leave of his Ordinary World (DullWorld) to enter the Special World of the Macguffin (DangerWorld). Stage Two is where the Hero says: errrm, thanks… but no thanks, I’m actually quite happy here sweeping the floors [A.K.A. “Refusal of the Call“], while Stage Three is where the unseen writing Gods swoosh the Hero up like the miserable piece of snot he is and propel him onwards to his adventure in DangerWorld, whether he likes it or not [A.K.A. “Supernatural Aid“]. Because, let’s face it, only a nutter would place themselves in danger for no reason.

    In the case of the Voynich Manuscript, most people are happy to enjoy the frisson of danger that comes with the Refusal of the Call: a cipher manuscript is all too obviously a Macguffin, a siren call to a mad textual adventure that you simply wouldn’t wish on anyone (let alone yourself). Anyone (such as myself) who has spent any significant time in the VMs’ World Of Research Agony will readily verify that this is basically the case.

    But I find it fascinating that the founding mythology of the 19th century Hermetic Order of the Golden Dawn was built around claimed cipher manuscripts. These had been owned by masonic scholar Kenneth Mackenzie, then found in a cupboard by Rev. A.F.A. Woodford in 1885, and then deciphered by William Wynn Westcott – the plaintext was in English, but had apparently been encrypted using a 15th century Trithemian-style cipher. Westcott then supposedly wrote to someone called Fraulein Anna Sprengel (whose contact details had helpfully been enciphered, though I can see no sign of them in the 56 released folios), who made him and his two collaborators “Exempt Adepts”: and gave them a charter to work the five initiatory grades described in the cipher manuscripts.

    Are the cipher manuscripts in any way genuine? Though the paper used for the 60 folios of the cipher was watermarked 1809, the association it mentions between the Tarot trumps and the Tree of Life was first proposed by Eliphas Levi only in 1855. And, for me, the simple act of using 45-year-old paper (never mind the constantly changing story surrounding the object, and the continued inability to find Anna Sprengel) makes me suspect that deception (or, at the very least, some kind of misleading myth-making) was intended right from the start.

    Doubtless many of the hundreds of initiates who felt compelled by the unseen Gods to accept this Call to Adventure heartily enjoyed their foray into the Golden Dawn’s DangerWorld. But regardless, the Cipher Manuscript at the heart of the constructed myth seems to have been nothing more than a Macguffin: Refusal of the Call is often exactly the right place to stop."


    http://www.ciphermysteries.com/2008/...er-manuscripts

    For more please consider En-lighten-ment or At-ONE-Ment as Westcott surely did. If the first author read Westcott's magnificent and voluminous work I doubt he would be so certain about MacGuffins and see a Dodo, in that mirror.

    http://www.golden-dawn.com

    And since I mentioned the mirror above it behooves me to include a review of the book written by Churchill and "MacGuffin". This reviewer seems to actually know something about alchemy and maybe even the mirror or camera obscura which is pictured or mentioned in the Voynich.


    Engaging adventure
    By Green Stone "Riverblue" on March 16, 2013


    This book about the mysterious Voynich Manuscript is an engaging adventure into the mystery of this enigmatic 15th century document. Various theories about the meaning and origin of the book are presented, including the possibility that the book was created as a hoax, perhaps by Voynich himself (who allegedly discovered it in the early 20th century in an old church) in order to make himself a fortune. However, the book has been carbon dated, and it is now believed to have been written between 1404 and 1438, making it unlikely it is any kind of hoax.

    The one area where this exploration of the Voynich manuscript is ironically weakest, is in precisely the area where I believe most investigation is needed, namely into its possible alchemical and magical associations. The authors of this book, Kennedy and Churchill, unfortunately (and rather foolishly) close that avenue of exploration down immediately, stating, (pg 228): "Knowing, as we do, in our modern scientific age, of the impossibility of alchemy..." Such statements are surprisingly foolish and blind for a couple authors who have entertained all other avenues of exploration. Alchemy is neither "impossible" nor dead, it lives today in many practitioners who are aware of what Kennedy and Churchill seem oblivious towards: namely, that alchemy is not identical with chemistry, that it cannot be "outdated" by science, because it is not "merely" an external science. Rather it is a spiritual and hermetic- magical practice using the symbolism of the laboratory to accomplish its ends. A couple books on the subject are Julius Evola's "The Hermetic Tradition: Symbols and Teachings of the Royal Art", and Dennis William Hauck's "Sorcerer's Stone: A beginner's guide to Alchemy." Carl Jung wrote extensively about the hidden, inner meanings of alchemy in the last part of his life, and it surprises me that the authors are so dismissive of this enormous treasure of hermetic wisdom.

    The authors, however, show similar disdain and a reductionist view towards other spiritual phenomena, referring for instance to the spiritual ecstasies and visions of Hildegaard of Bingen as "migranous" and as simply hallucinogenic symptoms of her migraine headaches. The authors provide as evidence for their smug reductionist attitude, the "Martian" script of an apparently deluded 19th century psychic, Helene Smith, based upon the investigations of one who sought to prove her a fraud. Perhaps she was a fraud, but the existence of some spiritualist frauds does not conclusively refute the existence of the spiritual and psychic realm.

    Such reductionist and dismissive approaches to possible spiritual phenomena preclude the authors from being able to engage in appropriate explorations of the mystery they seek to explore. I think it is telling that while historians, linguists, botanists, cryptographers, archeologists, antiquarians, and others have delved into the mystery of the Voynich manuscript, we have not heard from alchemists or magicians, modern day hermeticists or practitioners of esoteric and occult arts, who may be best positioned to understand the secrets of this document, through the images contained in it.

    The book ends on an interesting note. Churchill suggests that the manuscript may act as a mirror, revealing to its seekers the secrets that they are invested in finding there. In doing this, perhaps the Voynich manuscript demonstrates to us in its own inimitable way, that there may be good purpose in leaving something in undecipherable text. The mirror thereby produced functions in a similar way as some of the operations of alchemy themselves, and thus the Voynich manuscript could be viewed as an alchemical operation begun in the 15th century, which still performs its function upon everyone who looks into it.
    Last edited by R_Baird; 12-01-2015 at 08:44 AM.

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    Cabals of Jews who wrote the Zohar were attempting a magic they thought had value because the earlier Jews had re-written scriptures to remove the feminine or Matronit. Given that the Jews were suffering mightily in Spain (Casiberia and Iberia) they hoped the Zohar would be able to reverse the bad karma. We have Daniel Matt's involvement in it being re-written in a variety of places in this forum - he is a great scholar and Academic from Stanford University. He wrote The Essential Kabbalah from which I have quoted Unsheathing the Soul. It addresses more than mere gematria or numerical values to the Hebrew scripts developed by Phoenicians who built the Great Pyramid. Dion Fortune was a great occultist who said Cabala and Kabbalah spelling 'twist' the force or energy. Qabala is the ancient verbal wisdom passed on through BRDs or bards in languages coded or not, depending on the audience. This author is mentioned in studies of the Voynich Manuscript.

    https://books.google.ca/books?id=qRi...matria&f=false

    In what you can read from his work above you see a Professor Newbold saw microscopic shorthand inside each letter of the manuscript and was able to read attribution of it to Roger Bacon. Despite the good professor doing this Gerry Kennedy and his co-author Churchill who are quoted in the opening post; determine the Voynich Manuscript is a hoax. I doubt that!

    The next part I have chosen from thousands of possible venues all attacking each other and finding no reason (I emphasize.) or meaning in the work or the work of others who have worked the Manuscript. This part mentions Ukrainian and I know the old Ukrainian Language is very close to the original tongue of the Phoenicians - for good reason, if you read my work you will see. The origin of white people is near the Ukraine and archaeology shows they went to Urumchi where I found mention of jasper arrowheads dated to over 20,000 years ago in Barber's great book on those red heads. Caucasians we are called, and Casiberia and nearby Iberia (recently re-named to hide the importance - now Tiflis) all play a major role in my work.

    "Newbold was followed in his research by William Friedman. Friedman, who helped decode Japanese transmissions during World War II and would go on to help found the National Security Agency and become its first chief cryptologist, debunked Newbold's theories but was unable to come up with his own translation. He gave up on the manuscript after three decades of work, calling it impossible to decipher even after he collected a group of codebreaking experts just before the end of World War II and convinced them to work on the manuscript. The 1970s brought further research, as professors such as William Ralph Bennett started to use computers in an attempt to crack the manuscript's code. In the same decade, Voynich researcher John Stojko proposed that the Voynich manuscript was written in a modified version of the Ukrainian language."

    The early Ukrainian language is Phoenician just as many of the DNN are from there - see Language of the Goddess by Gimbutas.

    http://www.theverge.com/2014/2/28/54...k-in-the-world


    But almost as funny as any alien NONsense I have seen is this garbage usurping Professor Newbold.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eaec-d-GDrg
    Last edited by R_Baird; 12-01-2015 at 08:55 AM.

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    The cover art of the artifacts found in relation to the Oculist 'watchers' over Masonry (see Thread de-cypher-ing Masonry) has designs similar to the Voynich Manuscript which pre-date Voynich. It is likely that the oculists did not know about that manuscript but it is in the realm of possibility that they did know it well. If they had nothing to do with the Voynich Manuscript as I think, why is this art so similar? Is it Mandalic in nature? It would make sense given the Masons study the use of energy in Mandalas. Elizabeth Wayland Barber studied the lozenges and plaids of Italy and Malta before going to Urumchi. These lozenges and symbols derived from the energy uses of many ancient systems both astrological and internal attunement oriented form a basis for all language alphabets. I propose the Voynich Manuscript's biological drawing also take us back to a time when man was making alphabets with root systems such as Oghamic Language of the Trees and Birds.

    In further research I find others who have compared the Oculist manuscript with the Voynich - the plot thickens as they say. It gets more interesting when we see Roger Bacon had a copy of the so-called Voynich Manuscript. It would take a very long time to copy but that was indeed often done. If Bacon only had a copy - when was the original done and upon what system of knowledge was it developed?

    "After that section, it has a story about them "founding" Freemasonry years earlier as a joke (not historically possible) and then gives an in-depth account of the Masonic Master Mason ritual

    We only know about it because of a curious Cypher document called the Copiale, which was translated by Christine Schaefer, Kevin Knight, Beata Megyesi and Andreas Onnerfors. To read about the process of deciphering, see WIRED magazine, Dec 2012 pg 210 -218 and http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Copiale_cipher ;New York Times Oct 25, 2011 ;

    Read it in English here -http://stp.lingfil.uu.se/~bea/copiale/copiale-translation.pdf

    It had been compared to the still unbroken the cryptic Voynich manuscript, copies of which were owned by Roger Bacon; John Dee; Athanasius Kircher; Terence McKenna; and which can be viewed at the Yale Beinecke Rare Book Library in New Haven. It is a MUST SEE at http://beinecke.library.yale.edu/col...ich-manuscript if you can't make it to New Haven.

    Roger Bacon experimented with magnification by lens in 1262. Although lens had been laid on books for magnification since ancient times in Nineveh, Babylon. Leonardo da Vinci made some sketches which indicate an understanding of the principles involved in 1508. Johannes Kepler explained the science in 1604; René Descartes described the mathematics in 1636. Sir Isaac Newton stuck a blunt needle in his own eye to write OPTIKS in 1704."

    http://chuckfurnace.com/opus/index.p...ty_of_Oculists

    Lenses are found in archaeology in La Venta, Mexico and Ecuador dating to before the Queen of Sheba whose emerald lenses were probably made from Amazonian emeralds brought from Solomon's ships. Solomon is a key figure in Masonic study. (See the Paraiba Stones thread)

    David Koresh said he was the expert of experts when it came to the Keys of Solomon. Be that as it may, there is a lot about cyphers and codes which academics never study. http://psychicinvestigation.forumoti...tice-of-goetia
    Last edited by R_Baird; 06-19-2015 at 11:15 AM.

  5. #5
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    Funny how experts spend years with computers and develop so little and then someone using their head comes up with the alchemical usages those nymphs in the Voynich mean and were used for throughout many millennia.
    "Describing how they are combined and distilled. Even so, it is a rich area for the imagination that I mined for the plot of the novel. The secrecy and cryptic aspects make it fascinating. The plant mentioned above is obviously a lily or a lotus. These plants have certain intriguing qualities (from Wikipedia) :

    Recent studies have shown Nymphaea caerulea to have psychedelic properties, and may have been used as a sacrament in ancient Egypt and certain ancient South American cultures. Dosages of 5 to 10 grams of the flowers induces slight stimulation, a shift in thought processes, enhanced visual perception, and mild closed-eye visuals. Nymphaea caerulea is related to, and possesses similar activity as Nelumbo nucifera, the Sacred Lotus. Both Nymphaea caerulea and Nelumbo nucifera contain the alkaloids nuciferine and apomorphine, which have been recently isolated by independent labs.[citation needed]

    These psychoactive effects make Nymphaea caerulea a likely candidate (among several) for the lotus plant eaten by the mythical Lotophagi in Homer‘s Odyssey.

    Used in aromatherapy, Nymphaea caerulea is purported to have a “divine” essence, bringing euphoria, heightened awareness and tranquility.[citation needed]

    Other sources cite anti-spasmodic and sedative, purifying and calming properties.

    Some of the recognizable plants in the Voynich have similar attributes. The alchemists made various elixirs for various purposes, we know that is true. I have a copy of a book called The Elixirs of Nostradamus which is very interesting, though I noticed the text at the end of the book specifically mentioned that some of his more “dangerous” concoctions were not included. Nostradamus travelled somewhere to gather his predictions. His body was in the tower, but his mind was far far away.

    The alchemists were very busy in their towers. How about that first image from the Voynich? The blue circles? I wonder what the alchemists were seeing…"

    https://annmariebanks.wordpress.com/...ch-manuscript/

    Just as busy as the alchemists are the journalists and academics who refuse to learn anything about alchemy and get paid to lie about it. In this book you find a real scholar asking some important questions who learned a lot from Rulon who spent years researching the Voynich MS. I draw your attention to Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz who it appears was a Rosicrucian and maybe even an alchemist. http://mythosandlogos.com/perennial.html

    https://books.google.ca/books?id=o25...emy%22&f=false
    Last edited by R_Baird; 12-03-2015 at 05:15 PM. Reason: add link

  6. #6
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    Another fiction writer gets thinking and comes up with a far more palatable explanation and insight to the Voynich MS. Other than pandering to the alien crowd or Nephilim I like the conjunction of Druids, Jung and an Indigo child. BTW Jung's Red Book is linked here in the thread on he and Sri Aurobindo, it is not "lost" as Rollins puts it.

    "ACTION/ADVENTURE SPY THRILLER THE VOYNICH PROJECT: NEPHILIM RISING AN OMEGA FORCE CONSPIRACY THRILLER FOR SOME, IT’S AN ELEGANT ENIGMA … The past: For centuries, the Voynich manuscript has remained a mystery. The Lost Magical Diary of C. G. Jung-—The Red Book-—holds the key to unlocking its secrets. In 1940, aboard the Orient Express, Jung encounters the Nazi leader of the Vril Society, who is hell-bent on harnessing its powers and whose motto is “Not all good comes from above.” THE KEY TO FOUNTAIN OF YOUTH The present: The mission-—Abduct or kill al-Dajjal, a coldblooded war criminal who is committing mass genocide. But on their failed covert operation deep with the Syrian Desert, Major Brody Devlin and his special ops team-—the OMEGA FORCE, encounter a horrific discovery, bizarre experiments in genetic engineering. Meanwhile, on a dig in the Middle East, Dr. Blair Kelly-—a beautiful but tough-as-nails archaeologist—-rescues Wendy, a young orphan, from the clutches of the mad assassin, al-Dajjal. But it just so happens that our heroine, Blair, is a Celtic High Priestess and Wendy is an Indigo Child, who possesses fantastic powers. Together with the help of an ancient order of Druids, The Daughters of Awen, Blair must decode the Voynich manuscript. But the answer found in the lost diary of Carl Jung unlocks a dramatic childhood secret and reveals Blair’s strange bond with the child. FOR OTHERS, IT’S A CURSE … THE DEVIL’S LOOKING-GLASS Back in London when Blair’s brother-—an alchemist-—and Wendy are kidnapped, Blair and Devlin are plunged into an evil conspiracy of Neo-Nazis. The Indigo Children, Wendy and the Lost Boys, are being held prisoner at Eden School, where they are examined as unique specimens, the fountainhead of a new master race. In a daring commando raid on the British Museum, the Voynich manuscript and the mysterious Crystal Skulls are stolen. Using Blair as a decoy, Devlin and his team dive headlong into an ancient quest that dates back to the Nazi Occult Bureau."

    http://www.amazon.com/The-Voynich-Pr.../dp/9608317681

    In this research I doubt they have consulted a real alchemist. My lifelong significant other was a graduate of Indiana University and it is possible a few discussions I had were able to motivate this research. Note the code and ask why the Voynich Manuscript has had so few (if any, I unlike Wikipedia, do not consider McKenna as an alchemist, he could be termed a Hermeticist I suppose) alchemists work on it. It is an Alchemical text.

    "Isaac Newton, like Albert Einstein, is a quintessential symbol of the human intellect and its ability to decode the secrets of nature. Newton's fundamental contributions to science include the quantification of gravitational attraction, the discovery that white light is actually a mixture of immutable spectral colors, and the formulation of the calculus. Yet there is another, more mysterious side to Newton that is imperfectly known, a realm of activity that spanned some thirty years of his life, although he kept it largely hidden from his contemporaries and colleagues. We refer to Newton's involvement in the discipline of alchemy, or as it was often called in seventeenth-century England, "chymistry." Newton wrote and transcribed about a million words on the subject of alchemy. Newton's alchemical manuscripts include a rich and diverse set of document types, including laboratory notebooks, indices of alchemical substances, and Newton's transcriptions from other sources."

    http://webapp1.dlib.indiana.edu/newton/

    Here we have someone saying they will soon decipher the Voynich by working with many Arabic and Semitic alphabets. I think that is just a start and that many other languages including Thai and Coptic will be seen. But most disturbing is Brian Clegg who says things about Roger Bacon which are downright insane!!! Even Wikipedia acknowledges Roger was an alchemist. And although he is credited with inventing the Scientific Method which Clegg's book title appropriates, he was NOT the first alchemist to observe before concluding. Check out the thread on The Secretum Secretorum for more on Bacon.

    http://brianclegg.blogspot.ca/2014/0...-crackers.html
    Last edited by R_Baird; 06-26-2015 at 10:17 PM.

  7. #7
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    Someone recently compared me to McKenna. Other than the drugs I have no problem with the comparison, it has been made before. He actually has a copy of the Voynich Manuscript and he is an alchemist according to some people including Wikipedia.

    "Now, what's so great about a book which nobody can read? Well first of all, it's very unusual, books which no one can read. Codes, immensely powerful methods exist for breaking codes because this is a matter of military intelligence and, uh, defense ,uh, concerns, and very sophisticated, uh, computer techniques exist to analyze any supposed piece of code and extract meaning from it, determine whether it is in fact encoded language or not, whether you can tell what it says or not. And the Voynich Manuscript has become a kind of conundrum of the intelligence community. Retired intelligence officers take it on, and attempt to crack it; in fact, one of the best books written about the Voynich Manuscript is called 'The Voynich Manuscript: An Elegant Enigma' by Mary D'Imperio [move to comments: ed. note: See: https://www.nsa.gov/about/_files/cry...anuscript.pdf] and it is only available from the National Security Agency/Central Security Office [sic: 'Central Security Service'], Fort Meade, MD; this is what your tax dollars are being spent for is to decode this 400 year old manuscript.

    Okay, um, Voynich script: the most sophisticated computer analysis shows that the manuscript definitely is, uh, a language. There is meaning, the occurrence of prefixes and suffixes, certain internal rules of grammar have been identified, but, uh, the meaning has eluded all comers. And it, and several people, if there were more time we could go into people whose whole careers have rested on their supposed decoding of it. A man named, uh, William Newbold in the 1920s claimed a complete decipherment and it was later exposed to be a sincere but misguided mental derangement that contributed to his belief that he had decoded. Other people have made attempts but all of them, none are convincing, and so this is where the matter rests: one edition of this, of this, manuscript exists; it's never been decoded.

    My idea about it is that, um, to understand the Voynich manuscript you have to understand the career of John Dee, who was, uh, the greatest Magus of the Elizabethan age, the court astrologer of Elizabeth I of England, the man who had more, he had the largest library in England. Elizabeth and Sir Walter Raleigh, and Sir William Sidney visited him to see his collection of books. He wa-, he, uh, wrote on the elements of Euclid, he wrote books on navigation and astronomy, but he also was an occultist, and into secret codes; he was also an intelligence agent. He had been at the court of Rudolf the year before the sale is alleged to have taken place. He and his friend Edward Kelley, and, uh, they had bruited it about that Roger Bacon, the 13th century English monk, was the greatest astrolo-, uh, greatest alchemist of all time, and they had really made a flap about Bacon, in Prague at the court of Rudolf. Then, a series of alchemical experiments where they had promised the emperor to make gold and had failed caused them to be to exiled to Treblona. So they were in Treblona when this alleged sale of this manuscript took place in Prague. Now, all occult codes in Europe are based, or, at that time, were based on the work of one man, the Bishop of, uh, uh, Johannes Trithemius of Sponheim who wrote a book called the 'Stenographica' [sic. 'Steganographia'] which was published in 1535, and in it he explained numerous methods drawn from Roman sources and his own imagination for composing codes and encrypting messages, and all of the, uh, occult codes which follow are based on this. Dee hand copied, uh, a manuscript of the 'Stenographica' [sic. 'Steganographia'] when he encountered it in Paris. He was involved with a series of Angel contacts where he elaborated a language called Enochian, which like Voynich, is not written in, uh, characters of the English alphabet but has a peculiar set of characters unique to itself. Over 3000 words have been defined in Enochian, first through Dee's, uh, uh, spirit contacts and later the Golden Dawn took it up and further expanded it. But in Dee's diaries which are deposited in the British Museum there are 93 pages of encrypted material which are columns of number, and uh, I believe that, uh, uh, to eliminate the possibility that Dee was the author of the Voynich Manuscript the encoding methods of this material in his diary need to be computer analyzed and then compared to the Voynich material.

    The other possibility, which still involves Dee, is, uh, this person I mentioned, Edward Kelley, his companion of many years. Kelley's entrée... Kelley was a man of the lower classes, a much younger man, a scoundrel by all accounts, and his entrée to Dee was, he came to him with a book, which was in code, which he had claimed to have found in a, uh, crypt of a, uh, looted Catholic monastery in Wales (this was, uh, during the period just after Henry the 8th's break with Rome), uh, which, and he called this book "The Gospel of St Dunstable" and Dee worked on the decoding of it, but we lose sight of that book, and no known copy of it, no copy of it exists, so far as we know. But Arthur Dee, John Dee's son, in his diary, talks about how, in the period before Dee and Kelley went to Europe, his father spent a great deal of time studying a book which was covered all over with hieroglyphics. An-, and, uh, I believe e-uh... one of two things. I mean this is what seems reasonable to me, that, uh, that either Dee or Kelley ponied up a phony manuscript, which they sold into the court of Rud- , because they were poor there's no question about, I mean these guys had come to the end of their ropes. I believe only, John Dee is the only man who could have produced the Voynich Manuscript if it's contemporaneous with him. Either that, or, there is actually some truth to this strange story about Kelley bringing a book to Dee, uh, that he had found in Wales, and in that case, Welsh, and computer analysis of Welsh, and looking at Welsh as the possible basic text of the Voynich Manuscript should be done, and this has never been done.

    So I'm saying a further advance in Voynich studies logically demands an analysis of the codes in John Dee's diaries in a true and faithful relation, and analysis of Welsh in relationship to the known internal grammar of the Voynich Manuscript and, uh, there are other angles on it. Ummm. [long pause] Let me think. For instance.

    FB: What would you like to do with it?

    TM: Well, I would like to know what it says, uh. At first it sounds very mysterious and you actually reach out towards the idea that the reason the Voynich manuscript can't be read is because it is not in code at all. It simply is in a non-human language. It's like an object from another dimension which just, you know, here it is. It cannot be decoded because the bridge is too great. but I-, another possible problem is: perhaps modern people, modern cryptographers who deal with codes are over confident of their ability to break any code. Perhaps there is just some weird, quirky, way in which this code is composed that it would forever elude your effort to decoding. I mean, for instance, what if, somewhere there exists a set of grids which if laid over the pages in a certain way, caused the part of the Voynich script which could then be subjected to normal methods of, uh, decoding and would quickly reveal it's, uh grammar...

    FB: [unintelligible] and it's um...?

    TM: Yeah...

    BW: What does it look like?

    TM: What does the Voynich Manuscript look like? it's a small book, ten by seven inches and probably about two and a half inches thick. These, uh, these water color drawings are extraordinarily, uh, peculiar. I mean especially for that period because all herbals, of which there only about 50 or so in existence at that time, were, uh, a, uh, drew from a common pool of imagery which went back to the herbals of Dioscorides and that kind of thing. There was a very limited pool of images in the European mind at this point in time, and yet the Voynich Manuscript is utterly unique. it's completely peculiar. And the way-

    FB: What are the ingredients of the inks and the...?

    TM: Ah, well, none of this has been looked at and should be looked at, this is another thing: Chemical-, a chemical attack on the manuscript itself should be mounted. See, Newberry
    [sic: 'Newbold'], the guy who advanced, uh, a, uh, decipherment in the 20's, he believed, because a letter accompanied it, that said it was a Bacon manuscript, Roger Bacon, and this also points at Dee because Dee was under the patronage of the Earl of Northumberland, and he, uh, looted a number of monasteries where there were large Baconian libraries, and in fact Dee had 53 Baconian manuscripts in his possession, and cataloged in his library at Mortlake. Only 41 of those texts are known to exists in any form at all today. His library was burned while he was in Europe. It was burned by a mob incited against this wizard, and, uh, uh... so it may-, but-, so Newberry [sic: 'Newbold'] believed, then, that it was a Baconian manuscript, but-


    FB: Boy, Bacon gets in there everywhere-

    TM: -but when you look at it it's obviously 16th century. Everything about it marks it, and Bacon, of course, was 13th century, so it's clearly... It- There are many other angles, I mean like, Dee is implicated-

    https://terencemckenna.wikispaces.co...ich+Manuscript

    The interviewer and TM are mistakenly talking about two different Bacon people. Roger is the earlier one and a true alchemist; Francis is a later personage of the Plato type of alchemist - if one at all - political - a deceiver, but a good cypher guy.
    Last edited by R_Baird; 12-01-2015 at 08:51 AM.

  8. #8
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    There is a good possibility that frauds like Edward Kelley created the Voynich and in another similar case we have the Kolbrin which is a warping of an earlier myth stream called the Coelbrin - I cannot prove. The Culdees are in control of the myth now, it seems.

    http://www.bibliotecapleyades.net/he...kolbrin_07.htm

    Due to dating of the manuscript we now know it was created between 1404 and 1432 in Northern Italy around Milan to Venice. I will do a little further research on the mentor of Leonardo da Vinci to see who his mentor was or develop a connection from Nostradamus.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=awGN5NApDy4
    Last edited by R_Baird; 07-24-2015 at 09:37 AM.

  9. #9
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    Johannes Fontana worked with optics and the Voynich Manuscript shows microscope viewed cell structure.

    "One of the earliest, around 1420, had a particularly striking feature: the diabolical element was very definitely imagined as feminine. The projectionist, who held the lantern with a taper in his hand, wore oriental clothes (possibly a reference to the original inventors of the magic lantern). The drawing of the lantern was not exact; the apparatus is depicted around the image . . . . .." (Siegfried Zielinski, Media Archaeology, #5, A companion piece ).
    And I have found the author of the Voynich Manuscript I do believe.

    "Giovanni de la Fontana

    More then half a century before the extraordinary machine drawings of Leonardo da Vinci, the first technology manuscript of the Italian Renaissance was produced by a Venetian scholar and engineer—Giovanni Jacopo Antonio de la Fontana (known also as Johannes Fontana de Venetiis).

    Giovanni Fontana was born around 1395 in Padua, in the craftman's family of Michele from Venice. He spent his youth in Venice or in the surroundings. From the records of the University of Padua it is known, that he attended the University from 1417 until 1421 and received a degree in arts in 1418 and degree in medicine in 1421. University records list him as Master Giovanni, son of Michele de la Fontana, though later Fontana claims that in his youth he made inventions, built organs, and especially designed advanced fountains, whence his nickname Fontana.

    Fontana was promoted at the University of Padua by the scholastic scientist Paolo Nicoletti da Udine, known also as Paul of Venice, (c. 1370-1429), who was a professor of logic and philosophy in Padua from 1395 until 1420. Paolo tells us that the Doge of Venice sent him to Brescia to deliver a message to the condottiere Francesco Carmagnola. It seems Fontana spent rest of his life as a physician, appointed first as a physician to the Venetian army in Brescia, and later after 1438 as the municipal physician by the city of Udine. Fontana had at least one son, named Ottaviano. The date and place of Fontana's death are still unknown, probably around 1455-1456.

    Fontana had a wide range of interests and studied mechanical arts from the Greek and Arabic texts, reading historical works on optics, astrology and alchemy (intrinsic medical studies back then), pneumatic and hydraulic mechanics, military machines and the art of memory. Besides his interest of such devices, Fontana applied his knowledge to analyze some natural phenomena, e.g. to produce a treatise on perspective, which he presented to the painter Jacopo Bellini.

    In the early 1420s, Fontana's career in Padua must have been struck down by accusations of witchcraft. When witnesses at Padua exclaimed that a torpedo he had designed must run by diabolic power, he refuted them with contempt: the device was purely mechanical, as befitted a maker who was also a master of both medieval Archimedean statics and optics and of Renaissance engineering craft.

    Some time in 1420s, Fontana composed a very interesting treatise—Bellicorum instrumentorum liber, cum figuris et fictitys litoris conscriptus (Illustrated and encrypted book of war instruments), still preserved in Bayerische Staatsbibliothek . In fact Fontana was a prolific author in a range of technology, that was far wider than scientific instrumentation and military devices. At least ten of his treatises survived to the present and five others, still unidentified, are mentioned in his writings.

    The title of the above mentioned treatise is a little misleading or at least fails to take into account the wide range of technologies included in the 70 folio pages (with some 140 illustrations). Fontana's Bellicorum instrumentorum features, among others, siege engines, fountains and pumps, lifting and transporting machines, defensive towers, dredges, combination locks, battering rams, rocket-propelled animals, the first ever depiction of a magic lantern, scaling ladders, measuring instruments, alchemical furnaces and the most interesting in the context of this site—several robotic automata (see the images below)."

    http://history-computer.com/Dreamers/Fontana.html
    Last edited by R_Baird; 12-01-2015 at 08:31 AM.

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    My analysis above is based upon the analysis of the paper it was printed on. But there is also a possibility the paper was bought in Venice and taken to Prague - in which case the only person whose name is on it (Who was also an alchemist) is the likely author.

    http://hurontaria.baf.cz/CVM/

    And we often find fantastic journalistic claims in all fields of endeavour only to be disappointed when reading what actually happened. This is another such effort.

    http://www.beds.ac.uk/news/2014/febr...hire-professor
    Last edited by R_Baird; 10-17-2015 at 10:55 AM.

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