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Thread: Concussions in sports

  1. #1
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    Concussions in sports

    There are so many avid sports areas of the USA and parents go nuts about their kid`s games. Florida and Texas are two very prolific states when it comes to producing the best football players. There could be an effect carried over to politics (the Bush syndrome - sorry).

    http://www.cnbc.com/2015/09/18/96-of...n-disease.html

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    Was there ever a greater athlete? Was he more than just a hockey player? Love to see he is still with us.

    Things were looking bleak for Howe last October when he suffered a stroke. Weeks later, Mark told Ken Campbell of The Hockey News that the 87-year old’s health was “definitely headed in the wrong direction.” That was followed by two stem cell treatments in Mexico, which have moved things in the right direction. Though, Murray Howe said that his father is still battling a form of dementia.

    From Yahoo

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    Ken Stabler's death adds to the whole mess that a movie with Will Smith will demonstrate is more than vile or it's reversal.

    http://sports.yahoo.com/blogs/nfl-sh...132140120.html

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    And yes, there is controversy and some owners may really not have known what damage they did with doctor approved (read Paid off) drugs to keep players playing. Fraud includes paid consultants and the whole drug industry, not to mention the insurors.

    "Controversy surrounding Postconcussion Syndrome (PCS) dates back to the 1800s. 150 years on, contention still surrounds the lingering symptoms of insomnia, dizziness, irritability, depression, cognitive impairment and so on that affect between 30 and 80 percent of Americans following a mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI), or concussion.

    The present day billboards of personal injury attorneys seeking auto accident victims as clients hark back to the late 19th century, when railways became a popular means of travel. During that time, railway accidents, and the number of physicians reporting on conditions such as “Railway Spine”, increased dramatically. Present day conditions of PCS and whiplash present similar symptoms, with etiology that is still the subject of debate. With billions of dollars of claims at stake, courtroom adversaries can pick and choose from a range of conflicting studies and theories.

    History

    In his book Post-Traumatic Neurosis, physician Michael Trimble notes that:

    “In the nineteenth century and before, legal cases involved with personal injury were mainly to do with material injuries, such as loss of a limb or an eye, where objective evidence was unmistakable and quantifiable. With the advent of ‘concussion of the spine’ the situation changed, and the concept that the injured were victims of at best ‘shock’ and at worst spinal anaemia or meningitis became prevalent.”

    In the late 1800s, the dominant theory involved organic lesions of the spine and brain. London surgeon John Eric Erichsen gave famous lectures in 1866, later republished in book format in 1875 as On Concussion of the Spine: nervous shock and other obscure injuries of the nervous system in their clinical and medico-legal aspects, in which he opined:

    “The primary effects of these concussions or commotions of the spinal cord are probably due to changes in its structure. The secondary are mostly of an inflammatory character, or are dependent on retrogressive organic changes, such as softening, etc., consequent on interference with its nutrition.”

    This view was challenged in the 1880s by London and Northwest Railway surgeon Herbert Page, who asserted that one of Erichsen’s spinal concussion cases was potentially suffering the effects of syphilis instead, and pointed to a lack of post-mortem data in the majority of spinal concussion cases. Dr. Page proposed that fear and shock played a role, suggesting psychological rather than organic causes in the large number of people who had been in relatively minor accidents yet remained symptomatic afterwards.

    Among the many train crash victims was Charles Dickens, famous author of A Tale of Two Cities, A Christmas Carol, and Great Expectations. Dickens’ carriage did not go over the bridge, but was too close for comfort, dangling. He described “two or three hours work afterwards around the dead and dying surrounded by terrific sights”. Dickens suffered from symptoms including weakness and anxiety and being “not quite right within,” which he attributed to “the railway shaking.”

    Later, Oppenheimer moved from the theory of “Railway Spine” to “Railway Brain”, like Erichsen attributing symptoms to an organic cause. Pioneering French neurologist Charcot suggested manifestations of hysteria instead. After World War II, as cars became popular, whiplash injuries multiplied, resulting in similar clusters of symptoms.

    The Present Problem

    According to the CDC, there were 2.5 million emergency room visits, hospitalizations, or deaths associated with traumatic brain injury, the majority of which were concussions, or “mild TBI”, in 2010. These numbers are understated, as they do not include those head injuries which did not involve a trip to the hospital. While causes vary and include falls, auto accidents, assault, occupational accidents, and sports, some of these, such as auto or occupational accidents, result in litigation.

    Injury claims in the U.S. cost billions of dollars each year. Veronique de Rugy, a senior research fellow at George Mason University’s Mercatus Center indicated that despite medical advances which allow people to remain on the job, the number of Americans claiming disability has increased more than 6 fold.

    Her report points to the fact that changing standards put more weight on self-reported pain and discomfort. Auto accidents follow a similar trend where the cost of claims is rising while the overall severity of injuries is declining.

    The Coalition Against Insurance Fraud estimates that fraudulent claims cost $80 billion per year in the U.S. In a litigious society with so much money at stake, plaintiffs are often portrayed negatively by the media. In particular, those who are injured in ways that are not obviously disfiguring frequently are subject to great scrutiny and accusations of fraud. Types of fraud can include malingering, falsely assigning real symptoms to a compensable cause, or misrepresentation of diminished capacity following injury."


    http://brainblogger.com/2014/05/14/j...of-concussion/
    Last edited by R_Baird; 02-03-2016 at 12:43 PM.

  5. #5
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    Thurman Thomas brings up a good point about how a concussion being suffered by his quarterback lead to him getting the ball five times in a row. The opposing team still hits just as hard or even harder when they see this happening.

    http://sports.yahoo.com/blogs/nfl-sh...125207498.html

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